Displaying 1 - 9 of 9
City/Town
Amended
Portland Green Building Policy
Portland, OR
Requirement, Incentive
Minimum certification level: LEED Gold
In 2001, the City of Portland 2015, the Portland Development enacted Resolution 35956, creating the City's first Green Building Policy, which required all new City buildings to earn LEED certification. In 2015, the City updated the Green Building Policy to require commercial or mixed-use buildings over 50,000 square feet that receive PDC funding to earn LEED Gold certification. Commercial or mixed-use buildings less than 50,000 square feet must achieve either LEED Gold certification or a city-approved alternative standard. Commercial/mixed-use buildings over 5,000 square feet undergoing major renovations are required to earn LEED Silver certification. The resolution requires that all new occupied city-owned structures earn LEED Gold certification and meet other qualifications relating to energy and water use, landscaping, eco-rooves, parking, and waste. LEED certification and other qualifications are also required for existing city-owned buildings and tenant improvements in city-leased spaces. The city also provides incentives, training, financing, and technical assistance.
State
In effect
Oregon Administrative Rules, Chapter 330, Division 90
OR
Incentive
Minimum certification level: LEED
In 2012, the State of Oregon adopted Oregon Administrative Rules, Chapter 330, Division 90, establishing a Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) for up to 35% of the eligible cost of qualifying renewable energy resource facilities. Eligible facilities include: an energy saving facility, recycling facility, rental dwelling weatherization facility, transportation facility, car sharing facility, sustainable building practices facility, alternative fuel vehicle or facilities necessary to operate alternative fuel vehicles, a high-efficiency combined heat and power facility, a high-performance home, a homebuilder-installed renewable energy system or a research development and demonstration facility that complies with the rules in place. A Sustainable Building Practices Facility means a a building that LEED-certified, or is rated and certified by a program approved by the Oregon Department of Energy. In addition to achieving LEED certification, a facility must also earn at least two points under LEED Energy and Atmosphere Credit 1 (Optimize Energy Performance) and at least one point under LEED Energy and Atmosphere Credit 3 (Enhanced Commissioning).
City/Town
In effect
Sherwood Municipal Code, Title 16, Division V, Ordinance 2011-011
Sherwood, OR
Incentive
Minimum certification level: LEED
In 2011, the City of Sherwood adopted Ordinance 2011-011, allowing commercial development projects to earn three of the minimum five miscellaneous points required for development review by pursuing LEED certification.
State
In effect
Renewable Energy Development Sub-account, Chapter 730
OR
Incentive
Minimum certification level: LEED Platinum
In 2011, Oregon enacted Chapter 730, establishing the Renewable Energy Development Sub-account. To receive a tax credit, a project must earn LEED Platinum certification or a nationally- or regionally-recognized sustainable building program with similar performance standards.
State
In effect
Oregon Chapter 467
OR
Incentive
Minimum certification level: LEED Silver
In 2011, the State of Oregon enacted Chapter 467, allowing schools to finance projects through qualified energy conservation bonds, and receive lower interest loans from the Clean Energy Deployment Fund. If proceeds from bonds are used for construction, a project must earn LEED Silver certification.
City/Town
In effect
Central Point Municipal Code, Chapter 17.67
Central Point, OR
Enabling/Encouraging legislation, Enabling/Encouraging legislation
Minimum certification level: LEED
In 2010, the City of Central Point enacted a city charter that strongly encourages sustainable design practices and standards, recommending that industry accepted standards, such as LEED.
City/Town
Repealed
AP 99 1.03 Energy Conservation
Corvallis, OR
Requirement
Minimum certification level: LEED Silver
In 2008, the City of Corvallis released a energy conservation policy, which includes a requirement that all new city buildings meet LEED Silver standards. The policy also required existing city-owned buildings and facilities to be operated and maintained under LEED Silver for Existing Buildings. This policy has since been repealed.
County
In effect
Resolution 08-004
Multnomah County, OR
Requirement
Minimum certification level: LEED Gold
In 2008, the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners adopted Resolution 08-004, requiring all new construction of County-owned buildings earn LEED Gold certification, with a minimum of seven points earned in EAc1 (Optimized Energy Performance). The resolution also requires all major renovation projects of County-owned buildings to earn LEED Gold for Commercial Interiors. LEED Gold is also required for major renovations of County-leased space 10,000 square feet or greater. The resolution also states that all existing County-owned facilities shall be operated and maintained following minimum guidelines for LEED Silver for Existing Buildings.
City/Town
In effect
Eugene Sustainable Municipal Building Policy, Resolution 4884
Eugene, OR
Requirement
Minimum certification level: LEED Silver
In 2006, the Eugene City Council adopted Resolution 4884, creating the Sustainable Municipal Building Policy, which requires all new municipal buildings over 10,000 square feet to earn LEED Silver certification. The resolution encourages projects to earn LEED Gold or LEED Platinum, where practical and when funding is available. The resolution also requires that all new municipal buildings under 10,000 square feet follow LEED guidelines and that all existing municipal buildings be maintained and operated in accordance with LEED for Existing Buildings. New construction less than 10,000 square feet should achieve the equivalent of at least a LEED Silver certification level where technically feasible. Projects of any size for which certification is not feasible due to technical reasons should incorporate as many sustainable features as economically feasible, using LEED as a guide. The policy further stipulates that major renovation projects should use LEED as a guide and will be evaluated for certification on a case-by-case basis.